New hospitality apprentice campaign launched

Hospitality and catering employers are set to benefit from a new campaign aimed at helping the industry prepare for a new wave of apprentices.
 
People 1st has set up the scheme in advance of the changes to apprenticeships which are set to take place next spring.
 
The new standards have been designed to be more clearly defined, robust and fit for purpose and will be “truly transformative” for businesses, according to the charity.
 
Its campaign is aimed at making employers aware of the changes, while also preparing them to reap the benefits of improved staff retention and profitability.
 
It is estimated that an extra 229,000 skilled and managerial employees will be needed to fill vacant catering and hospitality jobs by 2022, with the new apprenticeships potentially filling much of the gap.
 
Speaking about the campaign, Simon Tarr, Chief Executive of People 1st, said: “Across the industry we are faced with a number of challenges, not least a £274 million annual retention bill and a dearth of managerial staff. Apprenticeships provide an excellent solution to this challenge and we encourage organisations to utilise the new standards to help them tackle retention.”
 
He added: “Our role is to help the hospitality, travel, retail and passenger transport industries, sectors that have long been built on offering fantastic career pathways, through apprenticeships – to understand, navigate and, benefit long-term from such legislation.”
 
Recent research found that diners in London and the South East have increased the amount they spend on eating out, with the typical household spending three per cent more in September than they did 12 months earlier.
 
However, the typical Brit actually spent one per cent less on eating out in the month, with the average household handing over £84.41 for the pleasure.
 
The Greene King Leisure Spend Tracker also found that there was a dip in spending on drinking outside of the home, with the typical household spending £44.04 in September.
 
By Owen Mckeon
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